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The Meadow Brown
Southern Hawker Dragonfly
Chaser Dragonfly
Common Blue Butterfly
Darter Dragonfly
Flying Dragonfly
 A Soldier Beetle
Grasshopper
Northern Brown Argus Butterfly
Hover Fly
A Red Damselfly
Ladybird
A Common Blue Butterfly
Hover Fly's
Horse Chestnut
A Southern Hawker Dragonfly
Gatekeeper Butterfly
Peacock Butterfly
House Fly
A European Hornet
Weevils.jpg
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Insects are all around us, they make up more than half of all living things on the planet. There are more than a million known insect species and there are probably many more waiting to be discovered. True insects are those that are classified in the Class ‘Insecta’. They are a major group of arthropods (a type of invertebrate, animals that lack a backbone), and the most diverse group of animals on the Earth. Insects rank among the most successful animals on our planet.

The Meadow Brown
Southern Hawker Dragonfly

Dragonflies are marvels of aerodynamic engineering. The adult beats its two sets of wings out of phase and can control both frequency and amplitude. The angle of the two sets can be controlled independently, allowing for some astonishing aerial manoeuvres, spectacular hovering and flight in any direction. Dragonflies love the world's wet places as their nymphs remain aquatic for months or even years. 

Chaser Dragonfly

Dragonflies are marvels of aerodynamic engineering. The adult beats its two sets of wings out of phase and can control both frequency and amplitude. The angle of the two sets can be controlled independently, allowing for some astonishing aerial manoeuvres, spectacular hovering and flight in any direction. Dragonflies love the world's wet places as their nymphs remain aquatic for months or even years. 

Common Blue Butterfly

The Common Blue is a small blue butterfly which flies throughout the summer between April and October. The most widespread of the blue butterflies, it is found in a variety of habitats including heathland, woodland rides, grassy meadows, parks and even large gardens. Caterpillars feed on clovers, Restharrow, Bird's-foot Trefoil and related plants.

Darter Dragonfly

This is a small dragonfly that spends long periods perched on vegetation, walls, fences and even garden canes and washing lines. It suddenly darts out from its perch in pursuit of a fly and often returns to the same perch. It is a very common species in England, Wales and Ireland, less common in Scotland.

Flying Dragonfly
A Soldier Beetle

Insects are all around us, they make up more than half of all living things on the planet. There are more than a million known insect species and there are probably many more waiting to be discovered. True insects are those that are classified in the Class ‘Insecta’. They are a major group of arthropods (a type of invertebrate, animals that lack a backbone), and the most diverse group of animals on the Earth. Insects rank among the most successful animals on our planet.

Grasshopper
Northern Brown Argus Butterfly
Hover Fly
A Red Damselfly
Ladybird
A Common Blue Butterfly
Hover Fly's
Horse Chestnut
A Southern Hawker Dragonfly
Gatekeeper Butterfly
Peacock Butterfly
House Fly

There are more than 120,000 species of flies worldwide.

The house fly is the most common species, carrying over 100 different kinds of disease causing germs, such as typhoid fever, dysentery, TB, Bubonic Plague, Leprosy, to name a few.

Another charming characteristic; A fly will lay eggs on your food and vomit on it before feasting, but they are particularly attracted to pet waste.

A female housefly will lay 3,000 eggs within its life span of 21 days.

Fly larvae will hatch into maggots within 24 hours.

A European Hornet

Hornets are often considered pests, particularly when they nest near humans, because they will defend a nest aggressively if they feel it is threatened. Though many people fear their sting, hornets usually get the worst of such encounters when their nests are poisoned or destroyed. In some areas, such as Germany, they are granted protection to preserve their role in the ecosystem.